Perspective Restriction and Dissipation

The anti-thesis of virtual reality is the actual restriction to only one point of view in only one direction. This is what “perspective” is.  And this explains what happened in western culture since his invention: the reduction of our perception of the world to one perspective.

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George Rousse

George Rousse captured this phenomenon in his installations with a perfect sense of accuracy. Those surreal photographs can only be taken from one very accurate location to show a perfect geometric shape. One inch on the side and the depth break the geometry.

Through the lens of the camera,  his primary material is space. He crystallises that architectural space by proposing a static reading through the frame of a photo.  I take this as a reaction to the dynamism, and potentially the loss of perspective, that an immersive approach to VR has to offer.

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George Rousse

The final photographic image perturbs our visual habits and convictions by presenting three kinds of space: the real space, where he makes his installations; an imaginary utopian space, which the artist invents and then carefully builds at his chosen site; and a new space that is visible from only one spot when he clicks the camera shutter, and exists only in the photo.

The convergence of these spaces goes beyond a visual game: Like a hall of mirrors, enigmatic and dizzying, it questions the role of photography as a faithful reproduction of reality; it probes the distances between perception and reality, between imaginary and concrete

What makes it so intriguing is that the mind of the beholder (your mind) can not stop to try figuring out all the work done by the artist before getting to that moment in time when he press the shutter. It is like we are transposing ourselves in that space and recreating the work. This phenomenon is also called embodied simulation.  (Gallese 2011, more on this in a future post)

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George rousse