Tag Archives: Art

Report from the VR World Congress 2017

Bristol was hosting this three days congress. What a good excuse to explore the West Coast of England. Loved it! How to report from such an big event pact of keynotes, talks, debates and demos about Virtual and Augmented Reality, interactive storytelling and immersive art, architecture visualisation and video game development, to name just a few of the field involved ? I will start with  the general trends, then some key points from the talks, to finish with what really got me hooked.

This event was a solid push from AMD. As far as I can remember, AMD had always an edge to better process 3D on his most known rival Intel. Well, it looks like they are still in the fight, but now to process VR wirelessly with their Nitero tech. And this is important because, being in a virtual environment is pretty cool, however, without any cable in our way, it will be much better.  Hololens has taken that mobility party from the start. They made quite a demo there, bringing forward the Mixed Reality concept. That being said, I am still not convinced with this small field of view and the basic interaction where you pinch things around.

Mk2 in Paris
SoReal in china

In the meantime, the big hype is around VR location-based experiences. Mk2 in Paris looks very neat, curating only high quality content and SoReal, a VR theme Park in China sounds epic. On a hardware note, I am curious to see what kind of headset the Chinese will bring on the market with their DeePoon!

Another main trend is the good old haptic feedback. They are working hard to bring the third sense into the game. We are not sure what shape it will take:  gloves, waves, arms, sensors,…but it was explore in every corner of the congress.

Most important is the effort given to produce high quality content. At this stage, only great content will bring VR to the mass.

Follows bullets points of my tweets and comments of the different talks I followed:

On Wednesday:

  • Vive and the Evolving Ecosystem of VR” with Graham Breen from HTC.
    HTC Vive – Haptic

    What’s next for Vive and his ecosystem evolution? Not much on the hardware side, a part of those haptic gloves shown there. They are focus on helping and promoting content creators with their Viveport platform and the ViveX accelerator.

  • Streaming VR/AR Content over the Web”  with Jamieson Brettle from Google. That’s where it get really exciting! AR/VR through the browser. He was telling about pretty good compression performances for cloud point 3D with Draco. For sound volumetric or spatial audio, they are using Opus with ambisonic compression.
  • “Ghost in the Shell VR – A deep Dive” with Sol Rogers from Rewind.
    He delivered a great talk about how he and his team made Ghost in the Shell. He gave no numbers and ask very nicely not to take a photo!

    That’s all I got from Ghost in the Shell
  • “The Importance of touch: Mid-air haptic feedback for VR & AR” with Tom Carter from Ultrahaptics.
    How cool is that, conducting emotions through mid air haptic feedback? Because, at the end, it is the sense of touch that makes things real.
  • Perception = Reality: Exploiting Perceptual Illusions for Design of Compelling AR & VR Interfaces” with Hrvoje Benko from Microsoft Research. Don’t try to be perfect. Use tricks and perception illusion.

Using perception illusion to extend the experience; Passive haptic; Perspective Projection Mapping;  The rubber hand effect revisited as Haptic Retargetting; Body warping and world warping are very promising technic that make you  believe you interacting with objects and that gives you this haptic feedback.

  • “Virtual Futures Track: The Ethics of VR Risks and Recommendations” with Michael Madar from University of Mainz
    • Why should we care?  Our environment influence our behaviour.
    • VR brings the illusions of place, embodiment and agency.
    • Beneficial vs manipulative in VR, tricky balance to make.
    • Are we going to create a rating system for VR experience?
    • “Users should be made aware that there is evidence that experience in VR can have a lasting influence on behaviour after leaving the virtual environment.”
    • Users should also be made aware that we do not yet know the effects of long-term immersion.”

On Thursday, I went to only one talk from the lovely blue hair Mary Kassin from Google who explained her day-to-day process. She prototypes a lot. Trial, user feedback and iteration make the most of her time. She also mentioned the Tango ready phone to play with AR.

Alright, this is all very exciting, full of ideas, however, what made the biggest impression on me was the couple of VR visualisation agencies showing off their architectural Immersive and Interactive walk-through made with Unreal engine.  With this very realistic real-time rendering, we are getting closer to eliminate the long hours of rendering time for still images for a full immersive experience in the early stage of the process.  That is happening right now!

How Much the Mind Can Bend?

If an artist is able to transform the essence of a place using visual illusions, I am wondering how far we can go by exploring the potential of Immersive Virtual Environments (IVE).

Peter Kogler’s installations absorbs the physical constraints of the places he is investigating into a new space/time paradigm. Those constraints are made of walls, floors and ceilings – the three fundamental elements of architecture. By mapping those curvy textures and lines all over those elements, he creates the illusion of flow, of oneness. Usual sense of up and down, right and left, front and back, vanished under the optical illusion of interlaced black lines. This artefact forces the participant to reevaluate his understanding of what his mind takes for granted. Walls appears as swirling vortex . Distances are altered. Floors rise and ceilings bend.

Peter Kogler Room Installation Illusion – Image Courtesy of MyModernMet.com

Now, transposing this into the realm of IVE, where the only constraints are coming from the electronic limitations of hardware to process the information, what kind of strange world will we be able to imagine?

Peter Kogler Room Installation Illusion – Image Courtesy of MyModernMet.com

This is an artist point of view, it is supposed to question the possibilities. However, from an Enactive Approach, the process he is using is very relevant to the design of meaningful IVE. This artwork can only exist through the interaction between the build environment and the moving body.

Similarly, it is by copying those constraints into the electronic realm, that we are allowing a smooth transition to the infinite possibilities of the virtual. As our senses will adapt to this new realm, we will be able to create complete out of this world environments serving the only purpose of the virtual experience. That being said, how will the embodied mind adapt to such an alien environment ? Is the body a constant  or will it change like the astronauts body into space?

“What I don’t know about space” Esther Stoker

28_stocker_hasselt_12
Based on a grid, 2012, 8,1 x 14,8 x 4,5 m Installation view Mind the System, find the Gap. Z33 – house for contemporary art, Hasselt, Begium. Photo: Kristof Vrancken

I love Esther Stocker’s work. She is onto something deeply rooted in human spatial cognition. The way we perceive the space around us can be reduce somehow to a finite numbers of line and curves. The essence of which can be express using black lines on a static white canvas or like here  in dynamic white space. Those sets are somehow photogenic, although those photos gives only one point of view of the installation. Only by moving inside the space,  we will start to question the way we perceive and process our surroundings.

La solitudine dell'opera (Blanchot). Parte 2, 2010, wood, acrylic, 2,15 x 1,80 x 12,70 m Associazione Ko.Ji.Ku., Galleria Studio 44, Genova. Photo: Loredana Ginocchio
La solitudine dell’opera (Blanchot). Parte 2, 2010, wood, acrylic, 2,15 x 1,80 x 12,70 m
Associazione Ko.Ji.Ku., Galleria Studio 44, Genova. Photo: Loredana Ginocchio

This work reminds me of the Feature Extraction Theories  and the Pandemonium Architecture from Oliver Selfridge (1959) with his “demons”.   In a bottom-up  approach (check old post on top-down processing), after the image is received on the retina, those “Features Demons” match any feature (black line) to be integrated as a perception that suppose to be linked with other to form a higher level system. However, here, you find yourself stuck in between because those pieces never really get to form a system. So you keep looking, moving, predicting ….

10_stocker_eindhoven08
Untitled, 2008, masking tape and emulsion paint on wall and wooden elements, 241 x 359 x 345 cm exhibition view the truth of basics, resetting the history of living between four walls, Lift off 2008, Onomatopee, Eindhoven